Don't Miss


Transistor Failed In V-Guard Stabilizer

By on May 21, 2020
Transistor Failed In V-Guard Stabilizer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

how to repair voltage stabilizer

Device: V-Guard Stabilizer used for Refrigerators

Complaint reported: Dead

Observation: Complaint was due to some component failure.

Trouble shooting and rectification done: Cleaned the inside thoroughly. Checked the transistors one by one using Analogue Multimeter. Found one transistor shorted. Replaced it. Looked for any other failure of components. Did not find any. Did a thorough dry solder patch up.




Result: Connected a bulb as load and switched on, the Stabilizer worked after about three minutes (time delay) and the output was perfect! Mission accomplished and satisfaction added to the collection bag!

Here are some pictures:

how to repair and fix voltage stabilizer

 

This article was prepared for you by Parasuraman Subramanian from India. He is 70 years old and has more than 30 years’ experience in handling antique equipment like Valve Radio, Amps, Reel Tape Recorders and currently studying latest tech-classes conducted by Kerala State Electronics Technicians’ Association. He has done graduation in BBA degree, private diploma in Radio Engineering and retired as MD of a USA company. Presently working as Consultant to Hospital and other institutions.

Please give a support by clicking  on the social buttons below. Your feedback on the post is welcome. Please leave it in the comments.

P.S-If you enjoyed reading this, click here to subscribe to my blog (free subscription). That way, you’ll never miss a post. You can also forward this website link to your friends and colleagues-thanks!

You may check on his previous repair article below

https://jestineyong.com/damaged-charging-socket-replaced-in-portronics-puresound/

 

Likes(73)Dislikes(0)

16 Comments

  1. Lynn Blakely

    May 22, 2020 at 7:41 am

    Good job as usual, made possible by use of, a thorough way to check all semiconductors. Nothing like to feeling of a job fixed.

    Likes(1)Dislikes(0)
    • Parasuraman S

      May 22, 2020 at 5:26 pm

      Many thanks!

      Likes(0)Dislikes(0)
  2. Humberto

    May 22, 2020 at 9:50 am

    Well done, Parasuraman

    Likes(1)Dislikes(0)
    • Parasuraman S

      May 22, 2020 at 5:26 pm

      Many thanks!

      Likes(0)Dislikes(0)
  3. Waleed Rishmawi

    May 22, 2020 at 12:51 pm

    Good job my friend. Have a blessed day

    Likes(1)Dislikes(0)
    • Parasuraman S

      May 22, 2020 at 5:26 pm

      Many thanks, my friend!

      Likes(0)Dislikes(0)
  4. Albert van Bemmelen

    May 22, 2020 at 1:09 pm

    Nice article with good detailed photos. Knowing this device is used for a moisture damp refrigerator I wondered why they used a plain pertinax (paperpressed) pcb instead of the better epoxy boards. Because pertinax is known for collecting moisture more easily.

    Likes(3)Dislikes(0)
    • Parasuraman S

      May 23, 2020 at 8:24 am

      Many thanks for your expert comments! This is kept on top of the Refrigerator, which is normally warm and there is no moisture. The 'paper pressed - pertinax' is news to me! Special thanks for that alone!

      Likes(0)Dislikes(0)
  5. Paris Azis

    May 22, 2020 at 2:48 pm

    Hi Parasuraman. "...using analogue multimeter"...This adds more value to a successful repair! Good old school...

    My greetings!

    Likes(4)Dislikes(0)
    • Henrique J. G. Ulbrich

      May 23, 2020 at 12:30 am

      Correct, Paris. I belong to the "old school" and appreciate very much working with the analog multitester. it gives me operational confidence.

      Likes(2)Dislikes(0)
      • Parasuraman S

        May 24, 2020 at 8:59 am

        Very true!

        Likes(0)Dislikes(0)
    • Parasuraman S

      May 23, 2020 at 8:25 am

      Yes, using Analogue multimer for checking transistors and diodes is as recommended by our great Jestine Yong in his book! This is a very valuable tool for any electronic technician!

      Likes(0)Dislikes(0)
  6. Yogesh Panchal

    May 22, 2020 at 6:37 pm

    Good Repair! Sir.

    Likes(1)Dislikes(0)
    • Parasuraman S

      May 23, 2020 at 8:26 am

      Many thanks Yogesh!

      Likes(0)Dislikes(0)
  7. Imoudu

    May 24, 2020 at 10:56 pm

    Good repair. However your new methodology of write up doesn't impact your knowledge of experiences to we young ones in the repair field as it use to be in your former method.The ways you explain your trouble shooting is so simple and explanatory before.I normally gain one thing or the other before. We young ones look forward to mentors like you sir.To me,your former method is better when it comes to knowledge sharing which is the main purpose of this platform.Satisfactory bag is yet to be filled to the brim.

    Likes(1)Dislikes(0)
    • Parasuraman S

      May 26, 2020 at 2:09 pm

      Yes. I do agree with you. But when the pending work piles up, I may have to cut short my time elsewhere. Moreover, the percentage of people who like to read a lengthy article is very, very less. No time, more importantly no patience! Anyhow many thanks for your feedback!

      Likes(0)Dislikes(0)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Free Report